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#12148 - 10/31/11 04:49 PM Facebook
Dianne E. Offline

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I read this interesting post online and it got my attention because I had just been reading about disclosure laws etc. in relationship to what Google provides authorities, Facebook disclosures about how much information about you is used.

Full disclosure on my part I don't participate in Facebook or any social medium. Facebook has just added a "feature" to bring up more information about you. I have nothing to hide, however in our community I think taking the risk of getting into some group can raise an ugly side. It seems like people are in competition with celebrities in contest mode for the most Twitter followers, everyone has a Facebook page. Is it wise for some people, probably some, I really don't know, I have never had any desire to blab online about my life with in many cases strangers because you meet them online. You both share one thing, you both own a computer and that you can log onto the Internet. For some odd reason people will say things about themselves being one step removed from personal contract and say some pretty darn things that can come back and haunt them for even future employment. Most employers these day look up your Facebook page/status.

So this post brought my thinking to a whole new level, not only is Facebook ratcheting up your personal information by easier access and it can become quite easy. Most sites have direct Facebook links to whatever you are reading etc. Facebook is an information gathering site.

Quote:
Oct 26 2011, 2:20 pm

Here is one for you. A couple of weeks ago a cop shows up at the door and asks me If I know Doug X, I don't want to use his last name. I say sure and he starts asking me questions about Doug and drugs and eventually starts accusing me of trafficking. He then advises me I will be watched.
As I stood there I was dumbfounded, WTF I thought. I know Doug didn't implicate me so WTF. I then found out a couple of other people were approached as well.

After some thought we figured out the cops had gone onto his Face Book page and were contacting the top friends on his list. I forgot to mention Doug was picked up with some weight (translation evidently Doug had been arrested for some "weight" meaning a higher than individual use of some drug) earlier and none of us knew about it yet.

So Face Book ended up being a list of people to question as one of us had done something illegal. So be aware, as you are having fun and posting with friends you are actually telling the Cops, the FBI and The CIA who you hang out with. Now they look at Face Book like they looked at High School yearbooks for suspects in the past and still do today.

If you are unaware all police stations have copies of all the yearbooks in the area and use them like mug books.

So beware, if you are friends with Abdul and are on his Face Book page don't be surprised when Homeland Security shows up at your door and wants to know where your associate Abdul is and invites you downtown.


Moral of the above story. If you just so happen to think Facebook is a cool place to tell the world about yourself or go to a site that happens to get the FBI's attention, your name might be on that roster for being "friends" of someone who might get a visit from authorities. I think of the dark side of the Internet in terms of it can also equal predators highway. It is an investigative tool and that is great, personally I would tread with caution in any social medium.


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#12150 - 10/31/11 05:23 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
Dianne E. Offline

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Privacy:

Facebook probes privacy violation by influence measuring site
10/31/2011 | 09:14 AM

Facebook is investigating a possible violation of its privacy policies by a site that creates a profile for anyone who comments on a Facebook public status update — even without his or her permission.

Marian Heath, who helps manage family safety at the social networking site, was referring to the actions of influence-measuring site Klout.com, as alleged by a social media professional.

"Separately, we’re investigating the company mentioned here to be sure that they are in compliance with our Terms of Service," Heath said in a reply to an article posted on AllFacebook.com.

The article had said the social media professional cited an incident where her son commented on one of her Facebook public status updates.

She said Klout created a profile for her son without his permission. The article said Klout can technically use the public comment to find anyone and pull in their profile photos.

At this time, there is no way to deactivate a Klout profile.

On the other hand, Heath said Facebook has made public comments are what they are — public.

"We think it’s important for adults and minors alike to be aware that comments made in public spaces – on Facebook, elsewhere on the Internet, or indeed anywhere in the offline world – are, in fact, public. In particular, we spend a lot of time educating teens about how they represent themselves online and ensuring that they understand how to use our tools to control what they share," she said. — RSJ, GMA News

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#12151 - 10/31/11 05:26 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
Dianne E. Offline

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Facebook Ticker lets non-friends snoop on you
10/29/2011 | 01:55 PM

Facebook’s Ticker, the Twitter-like feature that shows Friends’ status updates in real time, may be used to let non-friends snoop on Facebook users, a Brazilian researcher said.

A post on The Hacker News Saturday quoted Nelson Novaes Neto as saying this was not a bug but an issue related to users’ privacy.

“This new feature (Ticker) does not respect the privacy settings and it now Comments (updates), add friends, likes and can be seen by others (friend *) anyone without your permission," it quoted Neto as saying.

Neto used four Facebook profiles to prove his concept. His test scenario involved a woman cheating on her husband on Facebook.

In the scenario, the wife started communicating with her ex-boyfriend, but blocked new updates from automatically being published on her Wall so her husband would not know.

But with Ticker, a friend of the couple saw the updates of the wife indicating she had added the ex-boyfriend to her Friends list.

“The husband checked the profile of the wife, but found nothing there. His friend said that this new tool (Ticker) lets you see updates from anyone on your list of friends, as well as users that have been noted for his friends," The Hacker News quoted Neto as saying.

In an English translation of his blog post, Neto said he reported this issue to the Facebook Security team a few months back but so far has not received any feedback from them.

“In my view and opinion, this new feature of Facebook goes completely against the desire, knowledge and consent of users. We need to share this information so that all users are aware of the risk, if you also consider this a risk to society and users." Neto said. — TJD, GMA News

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#12182 - 11/03/11 06:21 AM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
JamesWQ Offline
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Registered: 10/29/11
Posts: 18
I would suggest that anyone with FB...
No contact info (email, phone number) visible, no address, no work info, etc
Hide friends from everyone except close friends/family
Hide pictures from public
Hide everything else from public

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#12644 - 01/31/12 12:36 PM Re: Facebook [Re: JamesWQ]
Dianne E. Offline

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This is an interesting view about Facebook and how it operates, I don't think hiding things will work, once they have your information it is fair game.

Excerpt:

Here’s an interesting coincidence. Last week, the European commission announced plans for a “comprehensive review” of the EU’s 1995 data protection rules “to strengthen online privacy rights” and “boost Europe’s digital economy”. The reforms include “a right to be forgotten”, which will, the commission claims, “help people better manage data protection risks online” and enable them to “delete their data if there are no legitimate grounds for retaining it”.

In the same week, Facebook made this announcement on its official blog: “Last year we introduced timeline, a new kind of profile that lets you highlight the photos, posts and life events that help you tell your story. Over the next few weeks, everyone will get timeline. When you get timeline, you’ll have seven days to preview what’s there now. This gives you a chance to add or hide whatever you want before anyone else sees it.” Note the authoritarian tone: “Everyone will get timeline.” Translation: you’ll get it whether you like it or not.

Now you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to see that there’s a serious collision ahead between the European commission and a powerful US company that is planning an IPO. And guess what? Facebook got its retaliation in first. The day before the commission made its announcement, Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, gave a speech to a technology conference in Munich. Her menacing subtext was neatly summarised by the New York Times thus: “Concerned about privacy? Maybe you should be concerned about the economy instead.” Translation: mess with us, Eurotrash, and we’ll screw you.

Sandberg’s speech was revealing because it exposes the line of argument that Google, Facebook, et al will use to undermine public authorities that seek to control their freedom to exploit their users’ identities and abuse their privacy. The argument is that internet companies create lots of jobs and are good for the economy and European governments shouldn’t stand in their way.

continues:

Is Facebook a corporate Psychopath

This is from an interesting article: With friends like Facebook

If you don't want the Psychopath in your life to track you get OFF of Facebook and all social media.


Edited by Dianne E. (01/31/12 12:41 PM)
Edit Reason: added link

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#13090 - 04/19/12 08:23 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
Dianne E. Offline

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Registered: 11/15/02
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From a recent email list I am on:

It seems like Facebook will do everything they can to sacrifice your online privacy -- even going so far as to publicly support a bill pending in the US Congress that would allow Facebook to hand over your data -- and the data of Facebook users around the world -- to other corporations or the US military, without a warrant.

Can you sign our urgent petition telling Facebook to drop its support of US government spying on its members?

If the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) passes, companies could intercept your text messages and emails to share with each other and the government -- giving the US military the power to track, control, and share almost all of your online information without the use of a warrant. They could even block access to websites, or cut off your internet connection altogether. Like SOPA (which Facebook opposed), CISPA is a major threat to internet freedom and gives the government broad power to protect big media companies at your expense.

Facebook’s opposition was instrumental in shutting down SOPA, but now Facebook is fighting FOR CISPA. That's why we're teaming up with our friends at Demand Progress to get Facebook to side with its users instead of military spy agencies, and in the process start a powerful, organized opposition to this dangerous bill.

Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, has said “We can’t let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the Internet’s development.” Yet with CISPA, he is supporting a far-reaching law that could dramatically limit our freedom on the internet. CISPA strips away previous privacy laws, and by creating a broad immunity for companies against both civil and criminal liability, it robs citizens of any means of fighting back.

Today vast amounts of our information is routed through the internet -- our shopping history, our Google searches, our love letters and personal communications, and much of our activism -- and all of it would become a fair target for the US military under a definition of “cybercrime” so broad that anyone could be a suspect.

Petition to send a message to Facebook to stop this bill

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#13938 - 10/17/12 12:56 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
Gary92 Offline
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Registered: 10/17/12
Posts: 18

Facebook is just selling everything about you to the other corporations and telling everyone about you.


Google is doing the same thing, NEVER put your phone number on there, as they will start calling you all the time, and you get all these offers from spam call machines that come straight through google.

The corporations are running everything, and it's down right sad.

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#13975 - 10/22/12 02:40 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Gary92]
Dianne E. Offline

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Registered: 11/15/02
Posts: 2788
Loc: United States

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#13978 - 10/22/12 03:17 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
Gary92 Offline
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Registered: 10/17/12
Posts: 18
Automatic face recognition? Omg, I don't know what to say anymore.

Facebook totally violates our rights and barely anyone has a clue about it.

I have been seeing in the news recently people losing their jobs over Facebook posts and so forth. It seems illegal for them to even have all this privacy invasion stuff but in the meantime no one cares as long as they keep hitting that 'like' button.

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#14119 - 12/15/12 09:41 PM Re: Facebook [Re: Dianne E.]
getaway Offline
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Registered: 12/15/12
Posts: 6
Ironically it was facebook that assisted in a big way to get me away from my psycho.... the other victims were trying to get in touch with me & that confirmed my thoughts about his behaviour.
Eventually when I felt it may be time to make a move one of them sent a g/f of mine some information (which confirmed my worst suspicions)
I then allowed one of them contact directly & being able to compare stories & hear about the other 4 'survivors' experiences convinced me that it was time to make my move! smile
I believe without their intervention that it would have been a while before I could make the decision to RUN!

The first thing the 'Psychopath' did was remove me from his friend list on FB ..... and close his account down..

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